Autumn schedule

Blogging has been light since my return from Moscow as I not only have classes to teach and a book to write, but I also have to prepare for a bunch of talks and conferences to which I have (over-)committed myself during the next couple of months. Here are the details:

29 September – I’ll be giving a talk entitled ‘Russia and Ukraine’ at the annual symposium of the Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies in Ottawa. Details here.

19 October – I’ll be participating in a roundtable on the subject of the Russian Revolution at McGill University, 3.30-5.30 pm.

25-27 October – Conference, University of Victoria, BC, on subject of ‘1917 and Today: Putin, Russia, and the Legacy of Revolution.’ My presentation will be on the subject, ‘Revolution, Emigration, and Post-communist Russia.’ Details here.

31 October – Group of 78 luncheon talk, Ottawa. I’ll be speaking on the topic ‘Do we still need NATO?’

9/10 November – I’ll be in Cobourg, Ontario, to give a lecture and run a seminar as part of the Northumberland Learning Connection program on ‘Russia 2017: 100 Years after the Revolution’. Details here.

16-18 November – Finally, it’s off to Ditchley Park, England, for a conference on ‘Russia’s Role in the World, Today and Tomorrow.’

I’ll try to fit some blogging in amongst all that.

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Interview with Alexander Dugin

On 31 August, I interviewed Alexander Dugin in Moscow. Below is my translation of the interview.

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Alexander Dugin.

Paul Robinson (PR): I am writing a book about Russian conservatism and wanted to talk with you as a well-known Russian conservative. In the West, many people talk of a ‘conservative turn’ in Russia. Do you think that this is the case?

Continue reading Interview with Alexander Dugin

The New Martyrs

No doubt you have come across the opinion that Vladimir Putin is resurrecting the cult of Josef Stalin. An example is this recent comment in the Ottawa Citizen:

In Putin’s world, Stalin was the hero who liberated Europe and under whose leadership, the occupied Baltic States, Ukraine, Belarus and other Soviet satellites, prospered thanks to Soviet benevolence. Putin has crafted himself as Stalin’s heir, and as such, there’s little room for the ‘truth’ about the 30 million who were murdered by Stalin’s regime, let alone any other inconvenient fact about Soviet occupation or mass repression.

Last week, a few colleagues and I had the opportunity to assess how true this may be. On Sunday morning we visited the Sretenskii Monastery in downtown Moscow. Like many other institutions of the Orthodox Church, it was destroyed during the Soviet era. In November 2013, a decision was made to rebuild it, and just a little over three years later, in May 2017, the new church in the centre of the monastery was consecrated.

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Sretenskii Monastery, Moscow

Continue reading The New Martyrs

Russia, the West, and the world

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