Commemorating the Russian Civil War

In my latest article for RT, I discuss a new monument unveiled last week in Sevastopol. The Monument to the Victims of the Civil War, otherwise known as the Monument to Reconciliation, seeks to overcome the Red-White divide, and honours those who fought on both sides of the fratricidal conflict. You can read the article here.

9 thoughts on “Commemorating the Russian Civil War”

  1. Crimea had been a White stronghold during the Russian Civil War. Prior to the aforementioned monument, there has already been some open post-Soviet commemoration to the Whites there.

    Crimea is said to be more pro-Putin than Moscow. Putin on more than one occasion has expressed positive views of the Whites and disdain for Lenin.

    This merge thing doesn’t work so well for the reasons you mention. Might be arguably better to have separate commemorations.

    One thing for certain, White perspectives get very much downplayed in favor of Svidomite (extreme Ukrainian nationalist) and Sovok (Soviet nostalgic.

    Related:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/08042016-fuzzy-history-how-poland-saved-the-world-from-russia-analysis/

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  2. Skimmed the comment section of the RT article, and saw a couple of decent comments right off the bat, which is unusual for most RT forums:

    PeaceBrother:
    That’s why the Russian coat of arms of the double headed eagle should also include either the hammer and sickle or red star. No reason why they couldn’t be placed together as both systems provided good aspects for the people.

    Revolutsia:
    The very few Americans who have learned about the Russian Revolution have just been taught the falsehood that Leninism led inevitably to Stalin. The civil war of 1918 to 1921, in which the White Army was backed by Britain, France, Germany, Japan and of course the US, is almost completely unknown in the US today, even to people who are relatively well educated.

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    1. “The civil war of 1918 to 1921, in which the White Army was backed by Britain, France, Germany, Japan and of course the US, is almost completely unknown in the US today, even to people who are relatively well educated.”

      *****

      BS. Russian studies programs in the West aren’t short of left of center academics harping on that in an inaccurate way that includes downplaying the Western support (in varying forms) for the Reds.

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  3. Well, take the fact that Mikhail and Yalensis coexist and even engage in civilized, fact-based discussions! Does it not prove that the divide is totally bridgeable, as long as the parties care about the Motherland and it’s people 🙂

    Even during Soviet times, there was a strong drive if not to reconcile, but at least to add nuance to the red-white divide. Take Tolstoy’s “The Road to Calvary”, “The Days of the Turbins” based on Bulgakov’s “The White Guard”, etc. Btw, 1968 movie “Sluzhili dva tovaristcha”, a cult classic where Vladimir Vysotskiy played the white officer, includes the scene with the horse reminiscent of Nikolai Turoverov’s poem cited&translated by Paul on this blog back in November, which is indeed quite poignant.

    As far as I can tell, in the Russian psyche, the reconciliation has mostly been achieved. It’s our history, and it’s the only one we have.

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  4. @Lola: Well, technically I am an Internationalist. My love for the Russian Motherland is more of a bug than a feature, in an otherwise perfect Internationalist machine! [irony]

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    1. Technically, I am as well – as most people would be, I am sure, if we lived in a more perfect world. But as long as that more perfect world is a distant dream, we have to choose. And choose we do…

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