13 thoughts on “Crosstalk”

  1. I’ve been watching CrossTalk since it began. Enjoyed watching you and it would have been great to hear more from you. Alexander always takes up more time leaving guests with less to say. I will get a copy of your book soon.

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    1. Dennis Cambly,

      Agree on that particular show on Russian conservatism being one of interest. What was said about Russian conservatives applies elsewhere. As was discussed, there’s a tendency to make simplistic categories, which can downplay diverse factors within the given category.

      Touching on your other point, CrossTalk and RT will benefit with some added input, in the form of having on some other individuals with quality input. Related:

      https://www.eurasiareview.com/29122014-with-room-for-improvement-rt-gives-time-to-diverse-views-analysis/

      https://www.eurasiareview.com/24102018-rt-russophobe-rating-challenged-oped/

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      1. What was said about Russian conservatives applies elsewhere.

        yes, my more general impression too, within “cultural limits” no doubt whatever culture may mean beyond money or economics. Maybe that is part of the “Western” crux (of the biscuit) if may cite Zappa.

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    2. I have never witnessed Alexander Mervouris before, beyond his writings.Very exalted type of expression.

      Otherwise, i would have liked to listen to the dialog longer.

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  2. Good interview, it’s a relevant topic. I watched the whole interview. You did very well on TV, Professor.
    I have to defend Mercouris, though. He has a certain “flair” about him, but he’s a serious thinker.

    Very true that many of the best Russian writers became conservatives eventually. Although it should be mentioned that Dostoevsky was a paranoid-schizophrenic, or otherwise mentally ill. Ditto Tolstoy.
    I wish they had mentioned my favorite writer, Griboedov. Like Pushkin he was a flagrant revolutionary and Mason in his youth; but ended up working as a diplomat for the Russian government; hence, patriotic, in case that’s the same thing as being conservative.

    Also, I think people are being a little ingenuous when they claim Russian conservatism is not inextricably bound up with the Russian Orthodox Church. And I’m sorry, but I just can’t buy that the Church is a driving force for change! Real change in the human condition only takes place when the securalists are in charge.

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  3. Very true that many of the best Russian writers became conservatives eventually.

    Yes, Dmitry Babich drew my attention too.

    Although it should be mentioned that Dostoevsky was a paranoid-schizophrenic, or otherwise mentally ill. Ditto Tolstoy.

    Now that’s interesting. Could you elaborate? Ideally on paranoid-schizophrenic too.

    You can do on your blog, I’ll check.

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    1. Okay, so maybe “paranoid-schizophrenic” is a tad strong for Dostoevsky. He had some mental-emotional issues, was a chronic gambler, and epileptic (which is more of a medical condition); if alive today, his docs would make sure he would be medicated. This is not to disparage his art or ideas.
      Tolstoy definitely got looney in his later years, but this could be ascribed to dementia or Alzheimers. Like, he would wander off for days, and his wife would have to go out and find him. That sort of thing. Again, not relevant to their art. I don’t know why I mentioned this, I probably shouldn’t have, it sounds like I am disparaging these great writers, but I am not, actually.

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      1. yalensis, i like your blog. And and yes, I love Dostoevky.. He helped me to understand something that was impossible to talk about. To anyone.

        As a student I more by accident sat on the same table as two nurses in a restaurant. They talked about epileptics. All I understood at that point in time that it disgusted them heavily to have to deal with it. I am sure, they felt that medication was the only helpful thing. It had to be from their perspective.

        Not too much later one of his ideas beyond his, if you like, central theme, in The Idiot helped me to get out of the most difficult situation I found myself caught in.

        https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129531-000-ecstatic-epilepsy-how-seizures-can-be-bliss/

        Thanks for the reply. Yes Alzheimer is another medical matter ….

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      2. All I understood at that point in time that it disgusted them heavily to have to deal with it.

        To be honest, at the time I had the feeling it may have been partly fear (nurces). Could this happen to me too?

        Many, many years later, or maybe not too many at that point in time, I stumbled across a psychologist who sent me to a test.

        If I may put it this way, in minor maybe also major expressions of this ill-functioning human the brain shows clusters of activity. Normal patients don’t show.

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      3. Hi, moon, thanks for the nice words about my blog. I like Dostoevsky too, I read him quite a lot, especially when I was a teenager; but sometimes I felt like it was just way too intense, and that one could go mad if one read too much Dostoevsky. At which point it is necessary to “cleanse one’s palate”, so to speak, with something more rational. Like maybe Pushkin or Griboedov!

        I am sorry that you had that experience with the nurses. As medical professionals, they should not have (a) been disgusted by epileptics; nor (b) have spoken about this in public where they could have been overheard.

        Brain-stem seizures happen in certain people, and it is not a choice, it is a chemical-biological issue and should not detract from the basic humanity nor human dignity of the suffering individual. That should be obvious, one would think.

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  4. I am sorry that you had that experience with the nurses. As medical professionals, they should not have (a) been disgusted by epileptics; nor (b) have spoken about this in public where they could have been overheard.

    First of all quite the opposite–in other worlds, no need to say sorry–since my perception of them or their talk, which may still be present somehow in between lines, no doubt fits into my larger nature/nurture patten then and now, modified no doubt. Thus:

    At which point it is necessary to “cleanse one’s palate”, so to speak, with something more rational.

    I looked up Griboedov, by the way. What would you recommend.

    Otherwise we can meet on cloud nine in let’s say 100 years from now and look a our present’s rationality.

    Maybe there are other writers that wrote about their experience I am not aware of, but he perfectly grasped the odd micture of fascination and fear for the event or condition. Only someone experiencing it can understand. How could I ever have expected it from those two nurses? That’s obvious, isnt’t it?

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